Neuronal Mismatch along the Auditory Hierarchy in an Animal Model of Schizophrenia

  1. GUTIERREZ PARRAS, GLORIA
Supervised by:
  1. Manuel Sánchez Malmierca Director

Defence university: Universidad de Salamanca

Fecha de defensa: 16 May 2019

Committee:
  1. Agnès Gruart Chair
  2. David Pérez González Secretary
  3. Ryszard Auksztulewicz Committee member

Type: Thesis

Abstract

In this thesis I present a compendium of three articles. I demonstrate that single neurons in the central auditory system exhibit prediction error responses that mimic those recorded in MMN studies. This funding support the hypothesis that single neurons along the auIn this thesis I present a compendium of three articles. I demonstrate that single neurons in the central auditory system exhibit prediction error responses that mimic those recorded in MMN studies. This funding support the hypothesis that single neurons along the auditory brain take their part in the computations of MMN and predictive activity in the brain. Moreover, these prediction error responses are organized in a hierarchical manner, consisten across species and awareness states. Similarly, my results agree with eeflkvidences showing that mismatch responses are dependent on NMDA receptor activity. All these results agree with the general predictive coding framework. Furthermore, I demonstrate that stimulus-specific adaptation at the single neuron level in the inferior colliculus are modulated by cannabinoids, adding evidences of cannabinoids neuromodulatory activity. ditory brain take their part in the computations of MMN and predictive activity in the brain. Moreover, these prediction error responses are organized in a hierarchical manner, consisten across species and awareness states. Similarly, my results agree with evidences showing that mismatch responses are dependent on NMDA receptor activity. All these results agree with the general predictive coding framework. Furthermore, I demonstrate that stimulus-specific adaptation at the single neuron level in the inferior colliculus are modulated by cannabinoids, adding evidences of cannabinoids neuromodulatory activity.